New Nordic Research Board

10.08.2004
The planned Nordic Research Board is set up to strengthen the Nordic countries as a region for research and innovation. One goal is to attract research investments and researchers from outside the Nordic countries.
By the Nordic Ministers of Education and Research: Ulla Tørnæs og Helge Sander (Denmark), Tuula Haatainen (Finland), Þorgerður Katrín Gunnarsdóttir (Iceland), Kristin Clemet (Norway) og Thomas Östros (Sweden)

The Nordic countries are prominent in many areas in an international context and this should be better exploited to create synergies and a stronger profile in the area of research and innovation. However, despite a considerable proportion of research results, measured as share of the economy, the Nordic countries are all small in absolute numbers on the global arena. Furthermore, there are no guarantees of continued success when scientific competition becomes fiercer. For this reason, it is necessary to establish a Nordic Research and Innovation Area (NORIA) with the purpose of strengthening the Nordic countries as a region in Europe and in other parts of the world.

Advanced, high-quality research is a decisive prerequisite for the development capacity of modern society and for international competitiveness. Research and the climate for innovation together constitute prerequisites for wealth. Research at the highest international level requires top quality environments. However, the cost of high quality research tends to get increasingly higher.

One example of successful Nordic collaboration is the Nordic Centres of Excellence (NCoE) to promote research of the highest scientific excellence. The purpose of establishing the centres was to create added value and improve the quality of Nordic research. The NCoEs are virtual units, four of which were established in 2002 for global change and two in 2004 for molecular medicine.

During the next few years, many researchers who are active today will retire, making it necessary to recruit many more young research -workers to universities, research environments, industry and society in general. Several Research Schools have been established in recent years, to attract and keep prominent researchers and research students in the Nordic countries.

This is a short version of the Norwegian article.
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